030 – Dubai 2009 – Part 2

             There were plenty of interesting planes at DXB. It’s hard for me to believe that this was just nine years ago. I was in hog heaven.

IN 2009, Pakistan International Airlines was still sporting its variety of tail colors, and the A310 was still the mainstay of its long-haul fleet.

Pakistan International Airways was just beginning to add Boeing 777-300s.

__________

Karachi-based Shaheen Air International is Pakistan’s second-largest airline.

__________

Aramavia operated a small fleet of Airbusses into DXB.

__________

Iran was represented by several airlines covering an entire spectrum of aircraft.

Iran Aseman Airlines operated a variety of aircraft types into DXB, including the Fokker 100…

and the ATR-72

 Caspian Airlines operated TU-54Ms to DXB

  Yas Air was probably the most colorful of the Iranian airlines, as illustrated by one of its IL-76TDs.

Iran Air flew its 747 freighter into DXB along with its all-cargo A300

 Kish Air flew Fokker 50s in and out of DXB all day long

Fars Air Qeshm flew one of the more interesting airliners into Dubai, the Yak 42D.

Taban Air was another TU-154M operator based in Iran.

__________

Asia Airways showed up with its AN-12.

__________

Global Supply Systems operates a small fleet of Boeing 747 freighters, several of which had been flown in British Airways colors.

__________

Saudia flew just about every aircraft type in its fleet into DXB, including its Embraer 170 and McDonnell-Douglas MD-90

__________

Royal Falcon Air Services operated this single ex-Air Canada Boeing 767-233

__________

Conquistador Helo Services, operating on behalf of Evergreen, brought this Sikorski S-92A demonstrator

__________

Middle East Airlines flew this A320 between Dubai and Beirut

__________

Kazakhstan-based Airlines 400 showed up with this IL-76

__________

Azerbaijan Airlines Boeing 757 in the carrier’s old colors.

__________

Airbus brought this NasJet ACJ-318 as a demonstrator for the show.

__________

Air-India Express ran flights in and out all day with its fleet of Boeing 737-800s.

__________

Indian Airlines was the only airline to utilize the option offered by Airbus of the four-wheel main landing gear. I have to wonder why Airbus did not offer this option when it was designing the “neo” line of narrow-body airliners,

__________

Safi Airways began flying between Kabul and Dubai in 2007 using a single 737-300, YA-HSB.

__________

Pamir Airways was another new airline from Afghanistan. The carrier used this ex-Delta Boeing 737-200

__________

Al Naser Wings flew this ex-Piedmont Airlines 737-200 between Baghdad and Dubai.

029 – Dubai 2009 – Part 1

One of the sweetest assignments I had while working for Professional Pilot was covering the Dubai Air Show twice, plus Middle East Business Aircraft Association (MEBAA) once. This was back in the day when these shows were held at Dubai International Airport (DXB) and the traffic there included plenty of Russian aircraft, as well as older-generation airliners. Typically, photography at, or even near DXB, is risky business. You run the risk of everything from harassment to arrest, as the police tend to take a dim view of aircraft photography.

But during events like the Dubai Air Show and MEBAA, all bets are off. It’s like “Amnesty Week”! You can photograph to your heart’s content at the airport. In fact, the exhibition ramp is adjacent to the main runway and even closer to the parallel taxiway. The only problem is heat haze, even in November, and even at relatively short telephoto range. But the traffic was magnificent, and the event attracted airplane spotters from around the world.

I photographed so many interesting planes that I will have to share these photos in several parts. So here goes…

Gulf Air operated a small fleet of A320s, most of which are gone now.

__________

Pakistan International Airlines operated eight Boeing 737-300s on regional and domestic services.

__________

Silk Way was one of several cargo carriers that flew IL-76s into DXB and also nearby Sharjah.

__________

EP-MND was originally delivered to French carrier UTA, and remains in service today as Mahan’s only 747.

__________

Dubai handled a good deal of traffic from Africa, including this Kenya Airways Boeing 767-300.

 __________

Ethiopian Airlines was serving DXB with Boeing 737-800s

 __________

This A300B4 began life as I-BUSD. It was eventually converted to a freighter and spent several years operating for TACA Cargo.

 __________

Kazakhstan-based East Wing served DXB with a total of seven IL-76s.

 __________

Bangladesh Biman operated a total of six A310-300s. At one point, these made up the bulk of the carrier’s long-haul fleet.

 __________

This was one of the first quartet of Boeing 737-800s delivered to then-fledgling FlyDubai. The carrier has grown into a major player within the Middle East, and a major customer for Boeing’s 737MAX airplanes.

__________

Oman Air flew both 737-700s and -800s into DXB

__________

Heli-Dubai’s Ecureuil was busy taking photographers up for flights above the airport

__________

The Embraer 135BJ (Legacy 600) was a fairly popular charter aircraft in the Middle East.

__________

After seeing a variety of long-range Kuwait Airways planes in North America and Western Europe, it was nice to see this A320 at DXB.

 __________

Maximus Air had its Herc on display at the show for people to walk through

__________

Afriqiyah Airways flew an irregular schedule into DXB, usually from Tripoli.

__________

Emirates had a fleet of 10 A340-300s for long-range operations. They have since been withdrawn from service and replaced by more advanced and fuel-efficient long-range equipment.

__________

Falcon Express Cargo Airlines operated a handful of Beech 1900s to run smaller cargo flights to outlying areas.

___________

The Dubai Air Wing was based at DXB, and its planes were in evidence during the air show.

__________

Royal Jet is a charter operator

__________

Eastern Skyjets was formed as a bizjet operator in 2005, The carrier eventually added four DC-9-30s and a pair of DC-9-50s.

__________

This is the type of airline I was happy to see at DXB!

More DXB photos to follow.

028 – Zurich – Part 1

Zurich (ZRH) has always been a crossroads between Europe, Africa, and the Middle East, not to mention the countries formerly under the Soviet Union. ZRH also has (or at least, had) some excellent photo locations. It has been years since I’ve been there so hopefully things have not changed for the worse.

Perhaps the highlight of the year is the World Economic Forum, which occurs in late January or early February. The event can bring a hundreds of VIPs ranging from Heads of State to infamous arms dealers, in aircraft ranging in size from 747s to PC-12s. You can AWAYS count on some surprises.

__________

Viva Air was a Spanish charter company which was based in Palma. This is one of its Boeing 737-300s with a temporary registration. It was later registered EC-FHR.

__________

Management Transport Munich was a German charter company that used a pair of Do-328s.

__________

Ganalf Air was one of several German airlines that flew the Do328 into ZRH

__________

Air Alps operated a modest fleet of Do328s on behalf of KLM until 2001

__________

ContactAir acquired a fleet of Fokker 50s from DLT-Lufthansa Cityline and rebranded itself under the Team Lufthansa banner.

__________

Deutsche BA had a fleet of Saab 2000s which were regular visitors at ZRH.

__________

Deutsche BA also used Fokker 100s into Zurich

__________

Lufthansa Express had a big operation into Zurich, and used mostly 737-200s, including this one with Nordam hushkits.

__________

Air Canada had daily flights to ZRH from Toronto.

__________

1997 was the 50th anniversary of Singapore Airlines, so the airline had this 747-400 in special markings. Today, all of Singapore Airlines’ 747s are gone, except for cargo.

__________

Following the breakup of Yugoslavia, JAT was replaced on some routes by Croatia Airlines.

__________

For many years, Air Algérie used Boeing 737-200 on its service to ZRH.

__________

Kenya Airways served Zurich with A310s for many years.

__________

Nigeria Airways DC-10 was also a regular visitor into ZRH.

__________

El Al served Zurich with a combination of 737s and 757s, primarily.

__________

Tristar 500s made up the bulk of Airlanka’s long-haul fleet until they were replaced by long-range Airbusses.

__________

Here is a special visitor during the World Economic Forum in 1995

__________

This was the real surprise at the 1995 WEF. As I looked through my binoculars at the plane on final approach, I could not believe what I was looking at!

__________

More photos to come from ZRH…

 

027 – DCA, 1977-1987. Mainline

Washington National Airport attracted a nice variety of airlines and aircraft back in the day. There were no long-haul flights, of course, and, in fact, 4-engine jets were prohibited from DCA, as well, with the exception of the Bae-146 family. The post-deregulation consolidation has not really begun yet, so there were plenty of subjects to photograph.

Certainly the most colorful airline on the field was Braniff, until its demise in 1982. Their 727s covered the spectrum.

N297BN, B727-100, Braniff

__________

N309BN

__________

N311BN

__________

N412BN

__________

N415BN

__________

N426BN

__________

N7278

__________

N7287

__________

In those days, Allegheny was one of the bigger players at DCA.

How I loved the sound of the Convair 580s two Allison D-501 turboprop engines!

N5809, Allegheny Airlines, Convair 580,

__________

The BAC-111 was affectionately known as “The Rocket” because of the roar that was emitted from its two Rolls-Royce Spey engines

N1114J, BAC-111

__________

It was during this period that Allegheny was changing its color scheme.

N1135J

__________

Allegheny also began adding Boeing 727-100s to its fleet.

N7044U, Boeing 727-100,

__________

Unfortunately, this is a poor photo of a rare airplane, an Allegheny DC-9-50

N921VJ, DC-9-50,

__________

During this time frame, Allegheny Airlines changed its name to USAir

N2111J, USAir,

__________

N1118J

__________

N955VJ

__________

N7050U

__________

Piedmont Airlines touted itself as “The Up and Coming Airline”, and it was certainly a wonderful airline to work for.  They operated a fleet of Japanese-built YS-11As.

N269P

__________

N752N was damaged beyond repair when it overran the end of Runway 36R at Charlotte.

N752N, Piedmont Airlines,

__________

Apparently, nobody realized how small the 737 Piedmont tail logo was going to look on a 727 tail! N833N was always easy to spot.

N833N

__________

The larger tail logo looked much better!

N836N

__________

Every once in awhile, I was able to get out on the roof of the old main terminal. It was a wonderful vantage point for photography, as is illustrated by this Northwest Orient 727-200.

N255US, Northwest Orient,

__________

Here is a photo of N62AF.  This is the exact Air Florida B737-200 that crashed into the 14th Street Bridge in January 1982.

N62AF, Air Florida,

__________

As North Central Airlines merged with Southern Airways to form Republic Airlines, the  DC-9-50 appeared in North Central colors.

N767NC

__________

As Republic proceeded to repaint its airplanes in new colors, its DC-9-30s started showing up at DCA.

N940N, Republic Airlines,

__________

New York Air was formed in 1980 with assets from Texas Air Corporation. Its DC-9-30s were used between La Guardia, Boston, and DCA.

N556NY, New York Air,

__________

Midway Airlines was another “Deregulation Airline” that began operations with DC-9-10s. The company later added DC-9-30s

N930ML_DEC81DCA

N930ML, Midway Airlines,

__________

As deregulation resulted in the creation of many new airlines, it also resulted in the demise of others, including National Airlines

N4732, National Airlines,

__________

Eastern Airlines was one of the largest airlines at DCA. Here is a DC-9 taking off.

N8957E, Eastern Airlines,

__________

Here is one of the last United 737-200s in old colors.

N9040U, United Airlines.

 

026 – DCA, 1977-1987. Commuters

When I got out of the Air Force, I relocated to the Washington DC area, and Washington National Airport became my new “home airport”. The DCA of the late 70s was barely recognizable from the DCA of today. Back then, there was a short-term parking lot overlooking an open ramp in between the Piedmont Airlines terminal and the commuter ramp. I met a group of other airline enthusiasts and together, we formed the Washington Airline Society. It was not unusual for me to run into other members of the WAS up on that hill, which we christened Hill 13. From about 2pm on, Hill 13 was the place to be at DCA. There was really no good reason to go all the way out to Dulles Airport, a,k,a, “Dull-Ass Airport”, where “busy” meant TWO Pan Am 747s on the ground, parked far enough away from the observation deck to make photography pretty much useless anyway.

Then, in 1981, my life changed. I was hired by Piedmont Airlines at DCA and the door opened to a whole new world. Not only did I now have the capability to travel around the country, but I also gained ramp access at DCA. The world was my oyster, and I dove into my new world with both hands and feet. At the same time, I began my photojournalism career by growing the “Commuter Corner” section of Professional Pilot magazine. Life was pretty darn good.

As my interest in commuter airlines grew, I found myself focusing my camera on the commuter activity at DCA. Those were dynamic days, with the commuter industry stepping out of its 12,500 lb restrictions and rebranding itself as the regional airline industry. With the exception of the Allegheny Commuter system, the regional carriers were still unaligned, which made for a kaleidoscope of color at the commuter terminal.

Allegheny Commuter, where it all began.

In the beginning, there was Allegheny Commuter, a creative use of code-sharing to permit smaller regional airlines to sell their seats under the banner of the major airline partner, and fly in the colors of the major airline.

Henson Airlines was the original Allegheny Commuter carrier, offering replacement between Hagerstown MD and DCA with a Beech Queen Air. It was quickly replaced by the first plane designed for the commuter airline industry, the Beech 99.

N396HA, Beech 99A, Henson Airlines

__________

Southern Jersey was one of the smaller Allegheny Commuter carriers. Here is a DHC-6 sitting on the ramp just before heading off to Atlantic City.

N102AC, DHC-6-300, Southern Jersey Airways

__________

Crown Airways, based in Dubois PA, was one of the earlier operators of the Shorts 330. The company was bought by Mesa Airlines in 1994.

N241CA, Shorts 330, Crown Airways

__________

Once upon a time, the Fairchild F-27 was used by Allegheny Airlines. But by the late 1980s, the Fokker F-27 was used by Allegheny Commuter, leased from Air Wisconsin.

N272SA, F.27‑500

__________

Aeromech was an Allegheny Commuter based in Clarksburg, WV. It was an early operator of the Embraer EMB-110 Bandeirante. Aeromech was also the first airline that I interviewed with for a job. In retrospect, I guess things worked out for the best.

N615KC, EMB-110P1, Aeromech, Allegheny Commuter

_________

The DHC-7 was one heck of an impressive plane. It can takeoff and land on a postage stamp! The FAA, in cooperation with Henson Airlines, developed a special STOL approach for DCA, which brought the Dash 7s on approach over the Potomac to land on Runway 15 and hold short of what was then Runway 18. If you haven’t seen it do its thing, you must!

N901HA, DHC‑7‑102, Henson Airlines,

__________

Allegheny acquired a fleet of Nord 262s when it merged with Lake Central Airlines. They found their way into the Allegheny Commuter system, operating with Pocono Airlines.

N26225, N.262A‑26, Pocono Airlines, Allegheny Commuter

__________

Here is another Pocono Airlines Nord 262 after being repainted in the updated Allegheny Commuter color scheme.

N26208, N.262A‑12

__________

In the 1975-77 time frame, Frakes Aviation converted nine Nords to meet United States FAR 298 regulation. The original Turbomeca engines were replaced with PT-6As, and the modified aircraft was called the Mohawk 298.

N29817, Mohawk 298

__________

New Haven Commuter was another early operator of the Embraer EMB-110 Bandierante

N711NH, EMB-110P1, New Haven Commuter Airlines

__________

Commuter Airlines served the Northeast with a fleet of Swearingen Metro 1s and ex-Allegheny Convair 580s

N5811, CV‑580, Commuter Airlines

__________

N5811 was eventually transferred to Freedom Airlines in 1981.

N5811, CV‑580, Freedom Airlines

__________

N7099N floated around among several airlines in the Northeast before ending up with Ocean Airlines. This was the very first production Beech 99, MSN U-1

N7099N, Beech 99, Ocean Airlines

__________

Empire was a small commuter carrier with a hub operation in Syracuse NY. The carrier served DCA with its fleet of Metro IIs.

 

N104UR, Swearingen Metro II, Empire Airlines

__________

Empire started operations with a single Piper Navajo, N546BA. Tragically, this plane crashed on approach to Ithaca on 5 January 1982, killing both pilots.

N546BA, Piper PA-31-310,

__________

Empire also flew a Navajo Chieftain. Occasionally, these two Pipers would be pressed into service to replace a Metro.

Empire Airlines Chieftain

N27529, PA-31-350

__________

Air North was one of the very few airlines to fly one of the very few Gulfstream 1-Cs. In an effort to capture the fast-growing market for airplanes in the 35-50 seat market, Grumman took its original Gulfstream I and stretched it to seat 37 passengers. Unfortunately, nothing was done to stretch the baggage compartment, and the Gulfstream 1-C (C for Commuter) was not a success.

Having said that, N159AN has a special spot in my heart, since one of my photos was the first of my photos used by Professional Pilot magazine. I’ll never forget the thrill I felt the very first time I saw “Photo by Jay Selman” in a magazine!

N159AN, Gulfstream 1-C, Air North

__________

Altair began operations with Beech 99s, and soon moved up to Nord 262s. The carrier operated a busy schedule out of DCA.

N274A, N.262A‑27, Altair

__________

Along about 1982, Altair upgraded its color scheme.

N488A, N.262A‑21

__________

In 1981, Altair took a great leap and added Fokker F-28-4000s to its fleet.

N510, F.28‑4000

__________

As the regional airline industry started to explode due to raising the 12,500-lb limitation, airplane manufacturers rushed to fill that gap. British Aerospace elected to take the approach of upgrading a tried and proven aircraft. The original Avro 748 design dates back to the late 1950s, and Hawker Siddeley Aerospace decided that this aircraft  was just what the industry needed. The manufacturer’s optimism was short-lived.

N748AV, HS.748‑2B/FAA, Air Virginia

__________

Look for further posts that will cover the mainline airliners from DCA, from over 35 years ago.

025 – JFK, 1970-1981. Runway 13L – Part 2

As I discussed in Part 1, my favorite spot in the world for many years was the approach end of Runway 13L. By the mid 1970s, I was finally using color slide film, and a zoom lens. Both helped me to take better photos. It never really occurred to me that I was capturing history.

__________

Scandinavian Airlines System was well-represented at JFK by both its DC-8-63 (OY-KT, DC‑8‑63, SAS), and 747 (OY-KHA, B.747‑283B)

__________

Montana Austria was a frequent visitor to JFK using an ex-QANTAS Boeing 707

OE-INA, B.707‑138B,

__________

KLM used its DC-8-63 into JFK well into the 1980s

PH-DEH, DC‑8‑63, KLM Royal Dutch Airlines

__________

LOT Polish Airlines flew IL-62Ms into JFK until 1980, when SP-LAA crashed near Warsaw in March 1980 after suffering an engine explosion.

SP-LAA, Il‑62M, taken just a few months before it crashed near Warsaw, forcing LOT to ground its remaining IL-62Ms

__________

I still remember my surprise as I was sitting in my favorite spot by 13L, I looked out at the approach path and, wow, that looks like a TU-154. Who in the world was flying TU-154s into JFK??

YR-TPJ, Tu‑154B‑2, Guyana Airways

__________

Trans International Airlines was a well-known supplemental carrier for both cargo and passenger service.

N4864T, DC‑8‑63CF

__________

Trans International was renamed Transamerica Airlines, and the DC-8s were re-engined with CFM-56s. The airline’s missions remained the same.

N4869T, DC‑8‑73CF

__________

It’s funny/sad to look back nearly 40 years ago and think that I regarded all those Boeing 707s as boring. I really had no concept of the history that my lens was capturing.

N8409, B.707‑323C, American Airlines

__________

I was much more intrigued by the shiny new 747s, that boasted piano bars and lounges…for a short while, anyway. Before long, the bean-counters realized that those lounges could be replaced by 30-40 more seats worth of revenue. It is also interesting to consider the domestic routes on which 747s were used, routes that are now served by twice as many aircraft holding half as many seats.

N9669, B.747‑123, American Airlines

__________

United Airlines had a large fleet of DC-8-61s, which were used on high-density routes, as well as the longer-range flights.

N8077U, DC‑8‑61, United Air Lines

__________

Formerly Aeronaves de Mexico DC-8-50, Aeromexico kept its DC-8s in service into the 1980s

XA-DOD, DC‑8‑51, AeroMéxico

__________

From the time that the Concorde was first designed, I would dream of the day that I would be able to snap a photo of one landing by “My Spot”. It was worth the wait!

G-BOAF, Concorde 102, British Airways

__________

Seaboard World Airlines was one of the largest cargo carriers at Kennedy, and enjoyed a long and colorful history. The company’s 747s were among the more colorful 747s at JFK

N705SW, B.747‑245F(SCD) , Seaboard World

__________

Evergreen International flew several DC-8s under the banner of Emery Air Force.

N8246U, DC‑8‑33(F)

__________

After “my spot” at the end of 13L, my next favorite photo spot was the top of the old Pan Am terminal. This was back in the good old days, when you could spend all day up there and nobody would bother you at all. True, you were looking into the sun for most of the days, but you still had a commanding view of Runway 13R/31L, the international ramp, and the taxiways coming around the corner of the Eastern Air Lines terminal.

Here is an Air Jamaica DC-8-50 rotating off Runway 31L.

6Y-JGE, DC‑8‑51, Air Jamaica

__________

BWIA eventually replaced its 707s to JFK with Tristar 500s

9Y-TGJ, L.1011‑500

__________

Hybrid color schemes are always interesting. Here is a Convair 580 belonging to Great Lakes Airlines of Canada, on lease to Air New England.

C-GJRP, CV‑580

__________

Iberia Airlines was one of the original operators of the Boeing 747. It was easily photographable as it approached the International Arrivals Building.

EC-BRP, B.747‑156, Iberia

__________

Swissair was another early operator of the 747, and they stayed in the fleet long enough to wear a revised color scheme.

HB-IGB, B.747‑257B, Swissair

__________

Global International Airlines was one of dozens of “Deregulation Airlines” that sprung up as the legacy airlines shed their older aircraft types. GIA, which was rumored to be tied to the Central Intelligence Agency

N15713, B.707‑331C, Global International Airways

__________

There were no two ways about it. The 747SP was NOT an aesthetically pleasing airliner!

N540PA, B.747SP‑21, Pan Am

__________

Flying Tigers DC-8-63 lifts off of Runway 31L

N795FT, DC‑8‑63CF, Flying Tigers

__________

Air Atlanta began operations with a handful of ex-United 727-100s.

N7083U, B.727‑22, Air Atlanta

__________

As late as the early 1980s, American Airlines was still operating their Boeing 707-100s.

N7554A, B.707‑123B, American Airlines

__________

It’s nice to reminisce looking at a Delta DC-8-50, but this is not any ordinary Delta DC-8-50. N8008D is, in fact, the first production DC-8, which was originally delivered to Delta as a DC-8-11 and later converted to a -51

N8008D, DC‑8‑51, Delta Airlines

__________

In the early jet airliner days, several major airlines, including United Air Lines, operated a fleet of pure-cargo DC-8F-54s

N8053U, DC‑8F‑54, United Air Lines

__________

American Airlines was another US carrier to operate a fleet of all-cargo aircraft. In this case, they were 707 Freighters.

N8417, B.707‑323C, American Airlines

__________

Montana Austria eventually added a small fleet of 707-300s to its -138Bs.

OE-IDA, B.707‑396C, Montana Austria

__________

If you look very closely at XA-DOE, you will see that it is the former N8008D, the prototype DC-8. When Delta was ready to retire it, Aeromexico bought it and used it on North American routes for several years. It was finally retired to Marana, where it was eventually scrapped.

XA-DOE, DC‑8‑51, AeroMéxico

__________

I still enjoy going to JFK, and there are still some good spots for photography. Unfortunately, New York tends to be a bit of a hostile environment toward airplane photographers, and most of the old spots are long gone. I’m glad I was able to experience and enjoy Kennedy Airport back in the good old days, before 9/11, before hijackings to Cuba, and before airplane photography was viewed as a dangerous hobby.

 

024 – JFK, 1970-1981. Runway 13L – Part 1

When I first picked up a camera in 1969, I was living on Long Island. La Guardia and JFK International were my two “home airports.” Of the two, JFK was much more interesting to me, since the traffic was much more varied and exotic. With a little exploration, I started to learn my away around the airport, and eventually found several prime locations for photography. I quickly determined that the hill adjacent to the touchdown zone for Runway 13L was a terrific spot,,, assuming, of course, that runway was in use.

 

Although I didn’t start shooting slide film in earnest until the mid-70s, I did occasionally burn through a roll of Agfachrome in my early days. Here is one of my first slides, and also one of my most memorable:

CF-THC, Viscount 757, Air Canada. This was photographed from my favorite spot in the world for many years, the approach end of Runway 13L.

__________

When I began taking photos, I was limited to a fixed focal length 135mm telephoto lens, which gave me very little flexibility in cropping. I also didn’t know beans about little things like getting the registration in the frame. So,

an Aeronaves de Mexico DC-8-50 was an Aeronaves de Mexico DC-8-50.

__________

Before the days of the Boeing 747, the “Stretch 8” presented an interesting problem for the branding experts…how do you paint a canvas in the shape of a pencil? Iberia offered one idea…paint the name of the airline twice. Once in front, and once in back.

EC-BSE, DC‑8‑63, Iberia

__________

Air India was one of only a handful of airlines to take factory delivery of the B707-400, powered by Rolls-Royce Conway engines.

VT-DJK, B.707‑437, Air-India

__________

The other Conway-powered jet airliner to grace JFK Airport was the Vickers VC-10, which many said could fly rings around rival 707. It was certainly one of the most graceful airliners ever built. It certainly looked sharp in BOAC colors.

G-ASGJ, VC‑10‑1151, BOAC

__________

When I entered the Air Force in 1973, I was still shooting print film, for the most part. I also thought that I was about the only “avgeek” in the world. My time spent in England and Miami taught me otherwise and changed my life forever. After my stint in the active Air Force, I moved to the Washington DC area. However, since my family still lived on Long Island, I still found plenty of opportunities to visit New York and pop on out to JFK on a regular basis. The world had changed, of course. The Boeing 707s and Douglas DC-8s had, for the most part, been replaced by Boeing 747s, Douglas DC-10s, and, to a lesser extent, Lockheed L-1011s among the top-tier intercontinental airlines. But my favorite spot by Runway 13L still called my name, and remained one of my favorite places on earth.

You could always count on some surprises at JFK.

68-10958, US Air Force, C-9A

__________

The DC-8-61 gave Air Jamaica an intercontinental reach, as showed up in New York as well as Europe.

6Y-JGG, DC‑8‑61, Air Jamaica

__________

BWIA amassed a hodge-podge collection of used Boeing 707s, including seven -300 series.

9Y-TEK, B.707‑351C, BWIA West Indies Airways

__________

Aero Uruguay was one of dozens of cargo airlines which attempted to establish a going concern using used Boeing 707s.

CX-BJV, B.707‑331C, Aero Uruguay

__________

Iberia Airlines of Spain was an early operator of the Boeing 747, but also added long-range McDonnell-Douglas DC-10s for some of its thinner intercontinental routes.

EC-CEZ, DC‑10‑30, Iberia

__________

Aer Lingus continued to use its narrow-body Boeing 707s for competitive reasons long after most of the Transatlantic carriers had gone all-wide body.

EI-ANV, B.707‑348C, Aer Lingus

__________

British Airways continued to operate its VC-10s until the end of the 1970s.

G-ASGC, VC‑10‑1151, British Airways

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As Northwest Airlines phased out its fleet of Boeing 707s, those planes were spread throughout the four corners of the earth. Two ended up with Laker Airways, but during low season, those planes were leased to Caribbean Airways.

G-BFBS, B.707‑351B(SCD), Caribbean Airways

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Meanwhile, Sir Freddie Laker was making history by establishing his low-cost Skytrain service in the highly competitive (and highly regulated) Transatlantic market.

G-GSKY, DC‑10‑10, Laker Airways

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Balair operated supplemental service to Switzerland, using an ex-Swissaiar DC-8-62CF and an ex-Eastern Airlines DC-8-63PF.

HB-IDH, DC‑8‑62CF, Balair

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Ecuatoriana probably had the most colorful fleet of Boeing 707s in the 1970s. The carrier operated a total of five 707s, all of which came from Pan American World Airlines.

HC-BFC, 707‑321B, Ecuatoriana

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Aerolineas Argentinas operated a reasonable number of Boeing 707s well into the 1980s.

LV-JGR, B.707‑387C, Aerolineas Argentinas was destroyed in a landing accident at Buenos Aires in January 1986.

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TWA operated a fleet of over 40 Boeing 707-131Bs. They were easily distinguishable from the larger intercontinental -331s by the last of the telltale UHF antenna on the vertical stabilizer.

N6723, B.707‑131B, Trans World Airlines

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In the1970s, TWA Boeing 707-331s were as common as, say, an American Airlines Airbus is today. Boooooring. Oh how I wish I’d known then what I know now!

N28728, B.707‑331B, Trans World Airlines

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TWA was one of the early Boeing 747 operators, and the vast majority of the carrier’s 747s were -100s.

N53110, B.747‑131, Trans World Airlines

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When TWA introduced its “new” color scheme, the airline name was applied in outline form on the fuselage. That all changed when the carrier was awarded the honor of carrying the Pope in 1979, somebody figured out that the livery would not show up well on television cameras. At that point, the outline was quickly filled in as solid red.

N93118, B.747‑131, Trans World Airlines

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Braniff International Airways had already made its mark with its “Flying Colors” fleet of airplanes, when it went a step further. One DC-8 and One Boeing 727 were painted up in a color scheme designed by well-known contemporary artist Alexander Calder.

 

 

N408BN, B.727‑291, Braniff

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For years, Flying Tigers Airlines was one of the premiere cargo and charter airlines in the country. The carrier’s DC-8s were common sights across the country.

N862FT, DC‑8‑61CF, Flying Tigers

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